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Fresh yeast slurry

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Post time 2022-9-16 10:34:01 | Show all posts |Read mode
I have some fresh yesterday US-05 slurry from a local craft brewery. Tomorrow I'm brewing 10 gallons of 1.069 IPA. I have always made 3 liter starters from liquid yeast and decanted before pitching. How much slurry do I need for a 3 liter starter? Or can I make a smaller starter?
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Post time 2022-9-16 10:45:42 | Show all posts
It's fresh slurry. Why do you want to make a starter? (I'm assuming they gave you more yeast cells than you would normally produce in your 3 liter starters.)
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 Author| Post time 2022-9-16 10:48:32 | Show all posts
Having never used slurry before, I don't know what I need. How much slurry do I need without making a starter? I have 4 jars each with about 5oz well settled slurry.
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Post time 2022-9-16 10:50:46 | Show all posts

What's the batch size and OG of the beer?
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 Author| Post time 2022-9-16 10:56:58 | Show all posts
Pint jars
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 Author| Post time 2022-9-16 10:57:35 | Show all posts
See post #1
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Post time 2022-9-16 11:03:27 | Show all posts

Oops. Yeah, you did already say. Assuming a slurry with "average" density and "average" non-yeast componts, a desired pitch rate of 750K cells/ml/°P, and 10 gallons of 1.069 wort, BrewCipher recommends 237 ml of slurry (about a cup).
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Post time 2022-9-16 11:17:24 | Show all posts
If that's a pint jar in post #5, pitch 2 of those, that would be about 8 oz (~240ml) total then.
How many jars did you get?
Was that harvested from a low/medium gravity (1.045-1.060) Porter or Stout, and not much bigger?
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Post time 2022-9-16 11:25:33 | Show all posts
I would use one jar; shake or slosh it gently and pour it in. I have no idea what the cell count would be, but it looks like a generous pitch to me.
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 Author| Post time 2022-9-16 11:29:58 | Show all posts
Based on my picture in post #5, there looks to be about 5 oz dense and some active on top. Do you think
Yes those are pint jars from a stout. Since I'm making an IPA, should I decant and just use the dense? They use US-05 for all their ales except a few specialities. I got 4 jars but I can get all I want. I'll just get quarts next time.
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Post time 2022-9-16 11:36:02 | Show all posts
My vote is one jar. Decant and direct pitch.
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Post time 2022-9-16 15:11:49 | Show all posts
Yes, about 5 oz (~150 ml) compacted slurry on the bottom, with frothy active yeast on top, 1 oz max, I'd say.
You can't decant the jar in the state it is. If you do, you'd lose the super healthy frothy yeast on top. Generally, only decant (mostly) clear supernatant, above a settled out cake, but never the (good) yeast on top.
If you let the jar sit in the fridge for a few days, the frothy yeast will have also settled out. Then you could pour off the stout on top. But it's much better to pitch live, non-dormant yeast. I'd seriously doubt the 2-4 oz of stout will taint your 10 gallons of IPA noticeably in any way.
I see some dark specks, but can't tell how much trub (and dead yeast) is mixed in with the yeast in the bottom layer. I doubt it's more than 10-20%.
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Post time 2022-9-16 15:31:00 | Show all posts
The frothy yeast at the top is the best part. I would not try to decant. If you were brewing something really light like a low-gravity cream ale, you might not want the residual stout getting in there. In an IPA, I really don't think it will matter at all.
If you really want to make a starter, scoop all the foam off the top and use that, and save the rest of the jar for a later batch. (that low-gravity cream ale might be a reason to do this)
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 Author| Post time 2022-9-16 19:22:15 | Show all posts
I also have two 4 oz jars that I picked up 2 days ago when I was thinking I was just going to make a starter. They have settled out to about 2 oz compacted slurry. I can decant and pitch one of these in addition to the full contents of one pint jar if that would be better.

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Post time 2022-9-16 19:55:26 | Show all posts
As @VikeMan said before, you may not need to pitch more than what's in that foamy pint-size jar, without decanting that is:
237ml / 30ml/oz = ~8 fl. oz of slurry.
The pint jar in the picture you posted may well contain 8 oz of slurry once the foam had settled out. That amount should be plenty for the job. as others have said.
Coming straight from a brewery, it should be good, active yeast, with relatively low amounts of trub, yes!
No need to pitch more than that in 10-11 gallons of a 1.069 wort.
Just as important as the right pitch rate, the chilled wort needs to be oxygenated (or very thoroughly aerated, at minimum) before pitching the yeast. And if the yeast was stored in the fridge (as is recommended), make sure to bring it to room temps before pitching.
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